Self-Hosted Wordpress Permalink Problems – Solve Database Issues

Finally, if you are still here it means that you properly applied point 1 to 3 of the checklist and you are still experiencing problems with permalink.

I have one last point that you should check out. Sometimes WordPress does not Continue reading Self-Hosted WordPress Permalink Problems – Solve Database Issues

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Self-Hosted Wordpress Permalink Problems – set AllowOverride all

WordPress uses .htaccess to manipulate how Apache serves files from its root directory, and subdirectories thereof. Most notably, WP modifies this file to be able to handle pretty permalinks. However, Apache must allow the use of .htaccess files in order for WordPress to use the file. Set the parameter ”AllowOverwrite” of the file ”apache2.conf” file to ”All” in order to tell Apache to allow the use of .htaccess files. Continue reading Self-Hosted WordPress Permalink Problems – set AllowOverride all

Self-Hosted Wordpress Permalink Problems – .htaccess permissions

In case you .htaccess exists and is placed in the right directory you should check if it has the right permissions and if the right user owns it. The right user should be your linux user handling WordPress. On Debian (it will be similar on other systems, I suppose) you can find the owner and the permission of a file or directory with the command  ls -l /path/to/directory. The output will tell you the permission on the file (”-rw-r–r–” in my case) and who owns the file (”www-data” in my example). The second ”www-data” indicates the group, which is identical than the owner in my case. Continue reading Self-Hosted WordPress Permalink Problems – .htaccess permissions

Self-Hosted Wordpress Permalink Problems – .htaccess exits

The first thing one should check is if the file .htaccess exists in the root directory of the site (/var/www/html in my case). The root directory of your site should contain a file index.php, in the same folder there should be the file .htaccess. WordPress uses this file to manipulate how Apache serves files from its root directory, and subdirectories thereof. Most notably, WP modifies this file to be able to handle pretty permalinks. Continue reading Self-Hosted WordPress Permalink Problems – .htaccess exits

Self-Hosted Wordpress Permalink Problems

Permalink problems can be a very annoying. The following post presents a guideline to fix the problem in a systematical way. Specifically, the post refers to the problem that pages, sites and posts of a self-hosted WordPress blog become inaccessible once one changes the permalink settings. Generally, there are various sources that can cause the same problem. Below you find a checklist that one can go through step by step to find the error. Continue reading Self-Hosted WordPress Permalink Problems